Home blog IREP2017 Film Review: Green Passport in a Rainbow Nation

IREP2017 Film Review: Green Passport in a Rainbow Nation

IREP2017 Film Review: Green Passport in a Rainbow Nation
0
0

Green Passport in a Rainbow Nation
Robke Macauley
30 mins.

The short film is a welcome detour in the wake of recent xenophobic attacks on foreigners, particularly Nigerians living in South-Africa.
With its backdrop as Ubuntu, a term in South-Africa that means ‘humanity’, the documentary investigates the implications of being a Nigerian (Green Passport) living in South-Africa (Rainbow Nation) and also profiles the resourcefulness of Nigerians that have gone on to establish successful businesses despite the existing stereotype ascribed to them. Ronke Macaulay interviews other nationals living in the country and their references about the Nigerians they have come across since living in South-Africa are nothing short of honourable. ‘They are responsible people’, says a Cameroonian, excitedly.
Temi a Nigerian Law student in one of South-Africa’s Universities complains that ‘it is a difficult living as a Nigerian here because we are usually associated with drugs and termed as ‘snubs’. Despite the stereotype, the Nigerian Consul General in South-Africa, Mrs. Uche-Aijule, says that some Nigerians have gone on to appropriate the negativity by dominating and holding strong positions in major sectors in South-Africa including education.
Perhaps Ronke is right when she states that ‘what unites us should be more than what divides us’.

Eseosa Eguamwense.
IREP Media Team