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Footprints is a documentary about Nigeria’s colonial past that comes in form a good number of episodes recording the pre-independent . It reveals the various moments of the = period of the country, as well as other African countries like Ghana, Sierra Leone and others. The themes however dealt with Nigeria, her existing warfare, evolving cultural matrices and, her process and build up towards industrialization, militarization, governance, popular cultural essence. Throughout the sequences of the documentary, there is an understanding of cities (the development of cities across the country) and their histories. This valuable piece of work, also gestured towards the representation of the constructions of major bridges such as the River Niger, the first attempt at railway construction in Northern Nigeria and so on. The film also gives credibility to the ways by which governance was conceived in Northern, Eastern, and Southern Nigeria- shortly before independence. One of the exciting moments in the film was the short narrative episode which was devoted to the growth and reputation of Star Beer, and how it permeated throughout the Nigerian nation as one of the earliest alcoholic drinks. The crux of the presentation simply testifies to the social responsibility and role played by the British Council Nigeria, situated in Lagos, and its quest at promoting the culture and practice of archiving of visual http://www.mindanews.com/buy-valtrex/ production in Nigeria . The project according to the curator and representative of the British Council to the IREP Documentary Festival, 2017, Mr. Fusi Olateru-Olagbegi, “is simply a work in progress”. It also means that putting the episodes together is yet to experience its final completion. It privileges sustained education about not just the history of Nigeria, but also the history of Documentary film-making itself as an art and practice, which should be important to all. Finally, in a time when the subject of History among High Schools and Colleges in Nigeria has been displaced from the curriculum about a few years back, there is a need for students to see such productions. This is not just urgent but crucial to their acquisition of unrivaled knowledge. British Council’s commitment to the development of the arts is not in doubt. It has shown remarkable temperament at social responsibility. Presenting a valuable work and material of history is not something to be seen as trivial in a time where the importance of Archiving Africa is imperative. TundeOnikoyi iREP Media Team

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Egypt’s Modern Pharoahs. Jihan El. Tahir.Director. 173mins In Egypt’s Modern Pharaohs Tahir chronicles, using the leadership styles of four prominent leaders who were crucial to the rise of Egypt’s nationhood shortly after independence from imperial powers. In three distinctive parts or episodes the documentary focuses on the individual visions and objectives of General Mohammed Naguid, Gammel Nasser, President Sadat and Mohammed Mubarak. In this documentary, El-Tahir gestures towards chronicling the rise to ‘’stardom’’, and fall/demise of each of these leaders during a time of transition in Egypt to a full democracy. But the various transition rose against the complex issues of various groups such as the Islamic Brotherhood, Radical Islamic Fundamentalist group, students protestants, and also the civil rights movements. Each regime had its own visions, derived extensively from either socialist or capitalist ideologies. But such visions seemed to emerge with tense opposition from a larger chunk of the citizenry. The interest of the leaders were put above the well-being of the whole nation. These visions led to the several uprising, snowballing into dangerous insurrections that gradually turned a once hopeful nation into a police state. Opposition to these governments were brutally smashed, outspoken critics were incarcerated unjustly, military prominence was kept at bay. These vestiges of history as documented in the film has led to the current state of the Egyptian nation. Jihan El. Tahir’s style of presentation is obviously unique as she employs a composite media structure that enables the viewer to recognise her personal signature as a documentary filmmaker. Her gift of underlying truth and fact is constantly privileged by her personal styles- of providing series of interviews with key players, shakers and removed observers of Egypt, still pictures of the presidents that form the subjects of this film-juxtaposing dialogues, conversation and speeches were significant for appropriate visual interpretation. In addition to the above, there are also numerous still pictures of uprisings and all manners of insurrection between and among groups. There are also footage of events which incredibly sustains the flow and narrative of the themes such as footage of the wars between Israel and Egypt; followed by the wreckage the wars left behind in Egypt. The point which Tahir makes in Egypt’s Modern Pharaohs much like any of her other films is that the structure of governance has always been the same, and does not change. The transition which the people of Eygpt constantly and periodically anticipate every moment are thus the same and not different from any previous government. Her position, therefore, is that the meaning or subtext of democracy in Egypt is that which depicts absurdity, and has come from a history of political instability. During a question and answer session after the screening of the film, she expressed her concerns pointing to the crux of the matter that, African leaders were never originally dictators as it was clear to all that they fought tirelessly for the freedom of the people. They also contributed immensely to the liberation of the people of Egypt from colonial rule-which lingered for no less than seventy four years. But a more crucial question which lurks on margins of the film is “how do our liberators become dictators?” This is an important question because it privileges the depressive realisation that all African leaders began with an ideal vision, and somewhere along the line ended up becoming extremely brutish and intolerant. They promised and failed to deliver the much needed nationhood and national solace desired. Jihan El Tahir has given us yet another film to think about. Africa as a continent is always in transition, as seen from the perspective of the filmmaker. Female filmmakers are registering their voices and they are constantly heard. Their presence are felt at the threshold of this crucial moment in the annals of African cinemas. Jihan El Tahir presence in the production of African documentary films is phenomenal. Her style creatively produces that sense of the archival language, which has permeated every single thing she has touched in a most idiosyncratic of ways. Tunde Onikoyi iREP Media Team
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Behind The Rainbow Jihan El-Tahri 124 Mins. In the wake of an Independent South Africa, the African National Congress (ANC); the country’s foremost partisan political organisation is set to nominate the first democratically elected president. The one who is first to be considered for this leadership position is Mr. Oliver Tambo because of his courageous exploits during the apartheid era but his failing health disqualifies his candidature. The man whose feet best fit this big shoe is no other than another respectable politician, brilliant lawyer – Nelson Rolihaha Mandela. Upon being elected, he is saddled with the onerous task of ensuring that the Republic is set on the wheel of social reconstruct. A task which guarantees overall economic gradation and political stability but this was short lived with instabilities of policies ranging from Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), a socialist pilot programme aimed at ensuring general social wellbeing of the people to the outrageous GEAR’s capitalist policy – one who is targeted at enriching only a few. The live coverage of the ANC’s National Convention and selected interviews with past and present political eggheads such as Thabo Mbeki, Jacob Zuma, and Chris Homi etc. gives an in-depth analysis to the very essence of the film. The precision with which narration follows and subsequent footages from street and actual parliamentary scenes affords the audience the rare privilege of living in the gory moments of the Katsung clash. The police and people confrontation as well the schism that pervades the ruling ANC party as well the defining moments when Mandela relinquishes power, the Thabo Mbeki ascension to power as well the incumbent Jacob Zuma. An intensified piece it is as it digs deep into the analysis of history and nationalism describing in all sense describing the pitiable state of the African politics. Using archival contents derived therefrom, it will certainly do well for further academic and sociological researches. Babatunde Odubanwo iREP Media Team
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Green Passport in a Rainbow Nation Robke Macauley 30 mins. The short film is a welcome detour in the wake of recent xenophobic attacks on foreigners, particularly Nigerians living in South-Africa. With its backdrop as Ubuntu, a term in South-Africa that means ‘humanity’, the documentary investigates the implications of being a Nigerian (Green Passport) living in South-Africa (Rainbow Nation) and also profiles the resourcefulness of Nigerians that have gone on to establish successful businesses despite the existing stereotype ascribed to them. Ronke Macaulay interviews other nationals living in the country and their references about the Nigerians they have come across since living in South-Africa are nothing short of honourable. ‘They are responsible people’, says a Cameroonian, excitedly. Temi a Nigerian Law student in one of South-Africa’s Universities complains that ‘it is a difficult living as a Nigerian here because we are usually associated with drugs and termed as ‘snubs’. Despite the stereotype, the Nigerian Consul General in South-Africa, Mrs. Uche-Aijule, says that some Nigerians have gone on to appropriate the negativity by dominating and holding strong positions in major sectors in South-Africa including education. Perhaps Ronke is right when she states that ‘what unites us should be more than what divides us’. Eseosa Eguamwense. IREP Media Team
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The reputation of Jihan El-Tahri the foremost female Eygypian documentary filmmaker is a rare one. Her tenacity and painstaking attitude and elan towards her art is phenomenal. The in-conversation was much anticipated by the audience, and on the heels of the screening of her significant documentary, Behind the Rainbow. The documentary examines the transition of the African National Congress (ANC) and its crucial aspiration as a liberation party “by means of the evolution of the relationship between the prominent leaders, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma.” Not only does the film show the bitter rivalry, but the resultant temprament is such that it threatens to tear apart the ANC and the South African nation, while the masses seek and anticipate the much needed hope of change. The conversation became a moment of reflection for we Africans, and indeed the filmmaker herself-whose decision to make such a documnetary, is met with a kind of awareness. An awareness that the problem of African leadership, is constituted by the ‘veritable antipathies’among party members in any nation’s democracy, which has also become for Africa, a universal phenomenon. Fielding questions from media practitioner and scholar, Ropo Ewenla (who stood in for the much revered curator, documentary film maker, and professor of long standing) Professor Niyi Coker, Jian El-Tahir provides sensitive and yet techinical responses that encourages one to come to terms with her reasons to make Behind the Rainbow. Her stance is essentially humanitarian, as it resonates deeply with the challenges of a people whose political structures in the twenty first century are not divorced from its imperial past, and how such a past has influenced the development of a political and yet democratic birth or rebirth. The conversation with Jian El-Tahri was framed in such a style that it was inextricably linked to the screening of Behind the Raindow. The documentray is much more than an interrogation of South African politics but, an interrogation of an African political system. The film raises questions that are crucial to the current climate and problematic issues that are associated with African political independence such as: What are we not getting right in postcolonial African democracy? How has the mythologies of poltical independence in Africa, cut the people of Africa out of her restructurung agenda?Can the subaltern speak? If they can speak can they be heard by thier politcal leaders? If they are heard how do they (their political leaders) respond? What is the appearance of the structural problems of African poltics? In spite of the problems that actually lingers in South African politics, one thing comes to mind. Among the ANC party members and stalwarts, there are no lords and servants. And even if there were lords and servants such dichotomies are not allowed thrive or exit among them. (An ideal that has permeated the party simce the time of Oliver Tambo- handed down to Nelson Madela, to Thabo Mbeki and then to Jacob Zuma). Jian El-Tahri has given provided an important cinematic thriumph which tasks us all to rethink our politcs, our democracies as Africans and begin work (if we ever will) on changing the structures, which relied heavily on antiquated colonial structures. The documentary is a turning point to rethink Africa’s future. The first shift to the much anticipated restructuring of an ideal African dream. Jian El-Tahir’s growth and reputation is significant to African cinema. Her work will continue to generate discussions, conversations and controversies at various points and platforms for a long time. For the 2017 IREP Festival, her particpation and appearance, and the screening of her films are a set of mines, to the quality and finesse of the festival. – Tunde Onikoyi IREP Media Team
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Brooklyn to Benin Regina Romain 8 Mins. Brooklyn to Benin is a mixed media project on the survival of spiritual African traditional and religious practices throughout the diaspora. In this documentary, Regina Romain takes us into the basement temples of Brooklyn to the annual Voodou festivals in Benin. We visit Dahomey, Salou and Ouidah to see women in full practice. This short documentary gives us a beautiful visual look into the transnational connections of religion and culture. Imoh Eboh iREP Media Team
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Cuba: An African Odyssey Jihan El-Tahri 120 Mins. It is a common saying that’ he who does not know where the rain beats him cannot tell where his cloth dries’. Same can be said of Africa, the second largest continent in the world, with an estimated population of over 4 billion people still grapple with the perils of economic frustration, political instability and social disillusion. The Film, Cuba: An Africa Odyssey is a classic by the Egyptian diplomat turned documentary filmmaker – Jihan El-Tahri. The film seeks to affirm certain anomalies in the polity that had besieged the continent for over four decades, connecting the dots of our forgotten past, recognizing certain heroes of this cause and the very importance of chronicling our beloved history. Of the film she says, ‘there’s always another side of the story when archiving Africa but you have find it’. The 120 minutes narrative explores vividly with relevant footage, the influential roles of Cuban General-Fidel Castro; the Argentine revolutionary – Che Guevara in surmounting http://www.honeytraveler.com/buy-valtrex/ western subjugation. The voicing trailing the narrative from beginning says “Cuba was a living proof that David could beat Goliath”. We also see footage of Patrice Lumumbam who was a force to reckon with when discussing African politics and nationalism. His fiery speech at the Independence of his country, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and active participation in seeing to the truest liberation of his people, fighting ensuring the ideals justice and equality became entrenched. Alas! He died before the sun shone upon his dreams. He was assassinated by King Baudouin’s military junta. The determined efforts by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in striving for a stable and self-dependent Democratic Republic of Congo is well reflected in this documentary. An illuminate filmic example of the way archival research can be used to inform us of the historic events of our past that make us who we are today. One of Africa’s historic milestone in an ever-changing world. Babatunde Odubanwo. iREP Media Team
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White and Black: Crimes of Colour Jean-Francois Mean 58 Mins. Discrimination could be said to have existed for as long as man and it comes in different forms, some mild while some can be extreme. One of such extreme cases was revealed in the case of albinos in Tanzania as shown in the documentary titled White and Black: Crimes of Colour, directed by Jean-Francois Mean. In this documentary, we see Tanzania experience a major rise in killings of people with albinism in 2007. Vicky Ntetema, a BBC radio journalist, explores the journeys of people with albinism through following two young girls who are albino. It is revealed that many local Tanzanians kill people with albinism because of the suspicion that they are witches. We learn that there is an overall suspicion of albino looking people because of their visual difference, hey feel that albinos are irrelevant to the society. As a result of these killings, people with albinism have had to take safety measures by relocating in many cases. We are given close insight by the filmmaker through interviews and intimate footage with local people. There is usually a light at the end of every tunnel, but this film reflects an ever-present struggle of discrimination and displacement for people with albinism. Vicky Ntetema boldly seeks to give us a striking visual experience of the heart-breaking reality of colorism. Segun Abiona iREP 2017 Media Team
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Spell Reel Filipa Cesar 95 Mins. Since the start, no film (arguably) better reiterates the theme of this year’s edition of the festival in bare minimum; Archiving! The 97 minute long documentary directed by Filipa Cesar, takes us through the affects of a digitized protean research work that started in 2010 with collaborations from Sana na N’hada and Flora Gomes along with other contributors. From narratives about the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau between 1963 to 1974, to images of the decaying audio and visual samples of abandoned http://www.cheapxanaxpriceonline.com archived of tapes of actual events, Spell Reel raises issues on the importance of archiving a people’s story; a people’s history because “we are gradually losing sight of who we are”. The filmmakers travel to the places where the raw footages have been shot and from where they originate and this invokes a fresh set of conversations and debate. Spell Reel captures an ‘archival’ example and serves as a reminder audiences of the use of the archives in the present. Eseosa Eguamwense iREP Media Team
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