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Sine Plambech, the director of the film,  old this story using interview clips of Becky and re-enacted videos of her story. Becky lived in Benin city with her partner, her parents and three siblings  also lived in Benin. It is almost a norm for young ladies in Benin city to aspire to travel to Italy in search of ‘greener pastures’ and Becky was one of those aspiring ladies. In her course to travel out, she was swindled. She comes to find out out that the money she paid to procure her travelling documents had gone down the drain when the official at the airport told her the documents were fake, luckily she was not arrested. Or maybe it was just God trying to dissuade her from following through with her plan. After her first attempt failed, she decided to take another route. Through the great sea to Libya, then cross from Libya to Italy. She started making preparations to go abroad, sponsored by a certain nameless woman in Italy. Make no mistake, these girls know exactly what it is they are going to do in Italy. It is not any legal or respectable job. They know what they are in for, and going over there means going to become a sex worker. Their journey by road to Libya started out fine, but that did not last for long.  On the 10th day, they ran out of food, the same day a young man travelling with them died. No longer sure of what the road held for them, they’re spirits were defeated, pleading to be taken back to Nigeria. Going back was not an option however. They finally got to Libya and had to remain there for about two months, there was fighting in Libya and it was a dangerous time so they could not cross. Finally they headed back to Nigeria after months of suffering, hunger and uncertainty for what the future held for them. On their way back to Nigeria, her pregnant friend Maureen, who was with them went into labour. She delivered her baby but did not survive. All of these events give viewers a vivid picture of the reality of our women who believe the government and their economy has failed them. Now they are left to cater for themselves and their families, and if they cannot do that in Nigeria, they are prepared to go through harsh conditions to go abroad – sell their bodies, make money and come back home. The honesty in this documentary is touching, as Becky made it clear that she would not stop trying to find her way abroad. The only options seems to try again. TASHA SARUMI    IREP Media Team
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Faaji Agba, the Award winning documentary film is a “LABOUR OF LOVE” project by filmmaker Remi Vaughn-Richards on Lagos history, culture and music from 1940 to date. She follows lives of all and the death of some seven 65 to 85 year old Yoruba musicians. It didn’t start as a grand project, but it evolved as Remi joined forces with Kunle Tejuoso of Jazzhole Records. Kunle Tejuoso started a trail to rediscovering there men who had been forgotten by the society to form the FAAJI AGBA Collection since 2009, lighting up the torch of relevance of their kind of music and keeping the legacy for generations to come; with documentation by Remi Vaughn- Richards. The journey starts with the legendary Olayiwola Fatai Rolling Dollar; he was discovered in 1999 in a small room in the Mushin area of Lagos and given an apartment in recognition of his music, leads us to the others like Alaba Pedro, Prince Eji Oyewole, Taiye Anyowale, Samson Adegbite, Kunle Adeniran, Nureini Sunmola and Niyi Ajileye. Their music style ranged from highlife, juju to afrobeat. The story follows them to their New York performance in 2011 which took us to the end of Alaba Pedro’s (Palm wine Guitar man) chapter of the story; who died 3 hours into their flight back to Lagos from New York on the 6th of August 2011, he was buried in Ikorodu. S F Olowookere passed on 8th Aril 2012 and Olaiyiwola Fatai Rolling Dollar passed on in June 12, 2013. While this 91 minute long film takes us through the lives of the several men, it tells us of a good number of Lagos history in music which keeps us informs the audience in an intriguing way; like the story behind the statue of Kokoro the blind minstrel and his wife at Tinubu Square, Haruna Ishola and the Apala Band, how the Saw was used in 1945/46 to make music by hunters and farmers, how in 1967 during the Biafran war parties were organized in secret by these musicians, Fatai Rolling Dollar explain Juju music to have been created by a game or musicians tossing the cymbal or tambourine at each other singing “Ju si mi, Ju si e… owa di JUJU”. The documentary also spoke of Dr Victor Olaiya whose music still rings in the minds of the Lagos youth today. The history of Lagos entertainment began in Lafiaji according to this documentary. This is the part of Lagos where Fanti Carnival held in 1937, Fatai Rolling Dollar played here in 1958. Faaji Agba, Our Lagos story, Nigerian Heritage of the most beautiful musical legacies.   Imoh Eboh IREP Media Team
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This documentary, which was shot in Zurich, Lome, Benin and Berlin, is a real provocateur of change, which is our theme for this year’s festival. #CHANGE. It raised a lot of important questions. Do Africans have to travel all the way to Europe to learn about our cultural heritage? Big question.  Europe has a rich collection of almost all the original African art. The people long for the extinct culture of African art, making African art very desired by people and art in Africa then subject to theft. In this documentary Peter Heller showed us how art from Nigeria, Lome, Benin amongst other African countries are extracted and taken to museums in Europe. Different art collectors were interviewed. There’s nothing left in Africa, the good ones are already in Europe, these art collectors collect pieces of art and estimate the value, some can also tell the authentic ones from ones that are not. Europeans are very much more interested in our own art than we are, the documentarian used pictures, clips of interviews and videos to look at this more closely. Nearly one million Africans live off carving masks. Long ago, Africans sold their art for less than a pack of cigarette. These http://www.buydiazepamtop.com artifacts are taken back to Europe and America to people who greatly appreciate their value. Traditional African art in berlin, the original throne of a great Cameroon king is in a museum in Zurich, generations after his successors have to settle for the replica of the throne. Why? It can be argued that these collectors are taking the African art to Europe to protect them from the harsh weather and decay. In Africa, we are forbidden to see these masks we are afraid of them hence we do not know the value.  Are the collectors wrong for taking these artifacts to a place where they would be appreciated? Are they stealing from us or helping us preserve our history? I asked the documentarian, after all said and done, what is the change that you expected to inspire when you were making this documentary? He said we should its about local valuing of culture, and this film allowed for some enlightenment on that. I believe it was not easy for Peter Heller to put this documentary together, he must have stepped on some toes exposing art theft and illegal transportation of art.   Tasha Sarumi IREP Media Team
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guests2 March 24th is significant world over as the day that precedes the Easter holiday; it is also one in which documentary filmmakers converged on Lagos soil to learn and exchange ideas about the art of Documentary filmmaking, targeted at making bold statements through the art of documentary films. The Festival has attracted massive turnouts of audience in every class of the arts and this year there is a unique first time formal launch of the Foundation for the Promotion of Documentary Filmmaking in Africa (FPDFA). Having a roster of over forty diverse films, it will help to gratify this years 2016 theme of “DOCUMENTARY FILM AS AGENT PROVOCATEUR” and “CHANGE”. The day was kicked off with opening remarks from the Director of Goethe Institute (a partner of iREP), Mr. Marc Andre Schmachtel. Noting that the Goethe Institute has been a partner since iREP’s inception, he expressed optimism about the future of the growth of documentary filmmaking in Africa. Followed closely was the short address by the head of African World Documentary Film Festival, Professor Niyi Coker who has been a consistent long-time partner and collaborator with the festival. wole Then, was the Welcome speech by the Executive http://www.cheapambienpriceonline.com Director of IREPRESENT Documentary Film Festival, Mr. Femi Odugbemi, reiterating that the choice of the theme “CHANGE” was not only a solidarity campaign for the political terrain; the mantra is targeted at expressing the intricate quality of documentary film in bringing about desired positivism in the society for the present and the future at large. He announced that there will be 50 films to be screened at four venues- AFRINOLLY, Nigerian Film Corporation, Goethe Institute and Freedom Park which is an expansion from any of the previous years. He believes that there is so much to be done for Documentary film and in this light announced the unveiling of the official Foundation for the Promotion of Documentary Film in Africa (FPDFA). Professor Awam Amkpa said a few words as the Chairman of the Advisory Board as one of the members of the team who has been around since the inception of IREP. Later that evening, the day wrapped up with a highly attended cocktail event where the chairs and directors of the board of the FPDFA were revealed and offered their words of optimism for the expansion of the IREP movement.  
  • Babatunde Odunbawo
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