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Brooklyn to Benin Regina Romain 8 Mins. Brooklyn to Benin is a mixed media project on the survival of spiritual African traditional and religious practices throughout the diaspora. In this documentary, Regina Romain takes us into the basement temples of Brooklyn to the annual Voodou festivals in Benin. We visit Dahomey, Salou and Ouidah to see women in full practice. This short documentary gives us a beautiful visual look into the transnational connections of religion and culture. Imoh Eboh iREP Media Team
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Cuba: An African Odyssey Jihan El-Tahri 120 Mins. It is a common saying that’ he who does not know where the rain beats him cannot tell where his cloth dries’. Same can be said of Africa, the second largest continent in the world, with an estimated population of over 4 billion people still grapple with the perils of economic frustration, political instability and social disillusion. The Film, Cuba: An Africa Odyssey is a classic by the Egyptian diplomat turned documentary filmmaker – Jihan El-Tahri. The film seeks to affirm certain anomalies in the polity that had besieged the continent for over four decades, connecting the dots of our forgotten past, recognizing certain heroes of this cause and the very importance of chronicling our beloved history. Of the film she says, ‘there’s always another side of the story when archiving Africa but you have find it’. The 120 minutes narrative explores vividly with relevant footage, the influential roles of Cuban General-Fidel Castro; the Argentine revolutionary – Che Guevara in surmounting http://www.honeytraveler.com/buy-valtrex/ western subjugation. The voicing trailing the narrative from beginning says “Cuba was a living proof that David could beat Goliath”. We also see footage of Patrice Lumumbam who was a force to reckon with when discussing African politics and nationalism. His fiery speech at the Independence of his country, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and active participation in seeing to the truest liberation of his people, fighting ensuring the ideals justice and equality became entrenched. Alas! He died before the sun shone upon his dreams. He was assassinated by King Baudouin’s military junta. The determined efforts by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in striving for a stable and self-dependent Democratic Republic of Congo is well reflected in this documentary. An illuminate filmic example of the way archival research can be used to inform us of the historic events of our past that make us who we are today. One of Africa’s historic milestone in an ever-changing world. Babatunde Odubanwo. iREP Media Team
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White and Black: Crimes of Colour Jean-Francois Mean 58 Mins. Discrimination could be said to have existed for as long as man and it comes in different forms, some mild while some can be extreme. One of such extreme cases was revealed in the case of albinos in Tanzania as shown in the documentary titled White and Black: Crimes of Colour, directed by Jean-Francois Mean. In this documentary, we see Tanzania experience a major rise in killings of people with albinism in 2007. Vicky Ntetema, a BBC radio journalist, explores the journeys of people with albinism through following two young girls who are albino. It is revealed that many local Tanzanians kill people with albinism because of the suspicion that they are witches. We learn that there is an overall suspicion of albino looking people because of their visual difference, hey feel that albinos are irrelevant to the society. As a result of these killings, people with albinism have had to take safety measures by relocating in many cases. We are given close insight by the filmmaker through interviews and intimate footage with local people. There is usually a light at the end of every tunnel, but this film reflects an ever-present struggle of discrimination and displacement for people with albinism. Vicky Ntetema boldly seeks to give us a striking visual experience of the heart-breaking reality of colorism. Segun Abiona iREP 2017 Media Team
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Spell Reel Filipa Cesar 95 Mins. Since the start, no film (arguably) better reiterates the theme of this year’s edition of the festival in bare minimum; Archiving! The 97 minute long documentary directed by Filipa Cesar, takes us through the affects of a digitized protean research work that started in 2010 with collaborations from Sana na N’hada and Flora Gomes along with other contributors. From narratives about the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau between 1963 to 1974, to images of the decaying audio and visual samples of abandoned http://www.cheapxanaxpriceonline.com archived of tapes of actual events, Spell Reel raises issues on the importance of archiving a people’s story; a people’s history because “we are gradually losing sight of who we are”. The filmmakers travel to the places where the raw footages have been shot and from where they originate and this invokes a fresh set of conversations and debate. Spell Reel captures an ‘archival’ example and serves as a reminder audiences of the use of the archives in the present. Eseosa Eguamwense iREP Media Team
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